Tag Archives: Detection Kits

FOODsniffer – low-cost and highly portable lab-on-a-chip biosensor

FOODsniffer presented its patented, low-cost and highly portable lab-on-a-chip biosensor, which detects chemicals, infections, toxins, proteins and genetic mutations in plant and animal samples. The FOODsniffer biosensor is field-deployable and simple to use, comprising an all-silicon, fully integrated optoelectronic platform implementing interferometry for highly sensitive label-free multi-analyte detection. The light sources and sensing elements within immobilized antibodies are all on a single chip and used in single-shot cartridges. The device is controlled by a smartphone that sends the geo-tagged analysis results to the Internet cloud during the on-the-spot analysis. FOODsniffer is a complete business solution for field-based detection of harmful species at very low concentrations and, accordingly, has the potential to revolutionize numerous aspects of agriculture.
http://www.nfia.com/fft/201302/Articles/small-bites-8.html

An important use would be for an allergy sufferer who wanted to test for the occurrence of a dangerous level of a particular allergen in their food. This would especially be useful if they were travelling or eating in an unusual or high-risk location.
If you were a vegetarian or someone who only wanted to consume organic foods, you could use such a device to test for the presence of certain common meat proteins or residues of pesticides (which are forbidden in organic agriculture).
Anyone who was concerned about the variety of the grapes in their fine wines, or the variety of their produce or meat might use such a device to determine the variety. This is determined by DNA analysis.
If you were concerned about GMO, the device could be configured to detect many different types of transgenes in a food sample.
http://www.foodsniffer.eu/?page_id=271

Advertisements

Smartphone Device Detects HIV, Syphilis

http://www.webmd.com/hiv-aids/news/20150204/smartphone-device-detects-hiv-syphilis

The low-cost device can spot markers of the infectious diseases from a finger prick of blood in 15 minutes. It’s the first smartphone accessory that replicates all the functions of a laboratory-based blood test, according to the researchers.

“This is a new technology that uses smartphones to detect antibodies against HIV and syphilis. Although an encouraging development, there are significant limitations, such as comparison with confirmatory tests in standardized laboratories,” said Dr. Ambreen Khalil, an infectious disease specialist at Staten Island University Hospital, in Staten Island, N.Y.

The device — called a dongle — is small and light enough to fit into a hand, uses little power and will cost about $34 to make, according to the researchers.

Full Webmd Article

Community based fluid specimen collection and analysis

http://www.goviralstudy.com/

GoViral is studying how community viral diagnostic information and symptom information combined can be used to understand an individual’s risk of influenza. We would like you to provide you with an easy to use flu test you can use at home if you are sick.

GoViral Saliva Sample Instructions

GoViral Nasal Swab Instructions

Decentralised testing centres equipped with miniPCR kits and self/community collected samples from the sick. These serve as monitoring stations/hubs for existing diseases and future (expected) outbreaks.

The medical and government professionals seeking real benefit for their communities will be keen on this modest detection system

A paper diagnostic for cancer

http://newsoffice.mit.edu/2014/a-paper-diagnostic-for-cancer-0224

The technology, developed by MIT professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator Sangeeta Bhatia, relies on nanoparticles that interact with tumor proteins called proteases, each of which can trigger release of hundreds of biomarkers that are then easily detectable in a patient’s urine

This could be modified for various other applications such as Ebola, malaria, Lassa fever, Dengue and by the Kenyan Health authority to detect contaminants like b-HCG in the Tetanus vaccines or other vaccines.

Age of Bioterrorism: Are You Prepared? Review of Bioweapons and Their Clinical Presentation for Otolaryngologists.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24757076

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This review on Category A bioweapons is intended to help otolaryngologists (1) understand the concepts of bioterrorism, (2) identify a bioterrorism attack, and (3) recognize specific otolaryngologic symptoms and signs of Category A bioweapons.

DATA SOURCES:

PubMed and Medline databases.

REVIEW METHODS:

Review of current literature regarding Category A agents of biological warfare and their relationships to otolaryngology was performed using PubMed, Medline, and articles written by experts in the field of bioterrorism. Each Category A agent was paired with the term otolaryngology and then paired with epistaxis, sinusitis, airway obstruction, pharyngitis, tonsillitis, hearing loss, otitis media, and lymphadenopathy individually. For the latest accepted treatment and diagnostic strategies, bioterrorism was searched with filters for human studies, English language, and the past 5 years. Titles, abstracts, and papers were read for relevancy.

CONCLUSION:

While the use of bioweapons initially leads to nonspecific symptoms, a high index of suspicion and clustering of abnormal pathology will often lead the astute physician to the correct diagnosis of bioweapons. Some disease presentations of Category A agents (anthrax, smallpox, tularemia, botulism, plague, hemorrhagic fever) will involve the realm of otolaryngology( Ear, Nose & Throat Specialist).

IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

The head and neck manifestations of a Category A bioweapon attack will require knowledgeable otolaryngologists for prompt diagnosis, treatment, and notification of public authorities. This will help decrease the morbidity and mortality of any potential bioterrorism attack.

© American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

KEYWORDS
Category A agents; anthrax; bioterrorism; bioweapons; botulism; hemorrhagic fevers; plague; smallpox; tularemia

New 15-minute test for Ebola to be trialled in Guinea

http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/News/Media-office/Press-releases/2014/WTP058046.htm

The 15-minute Ebola test is six times faster than similar tests currently in use and aims to speed up the diagnosis of Ebola cases. Early detection of Ebola leads to better infection control as medical staff can identify and isolate confirmed cases of Ebola faster, and start treating patients sooner. Ultimately, a faster test could reduce Ebola transmission and mortality.

The project is supported through a joint Department for International Development (DFID) and Wellcome Trust fund for rapid health research during the Ebola outbreak. The six projects are managed by Enhancing Learning & Research for Humanitarian Assistance (ELRHA).

The trial, led by researchers at the Pasteur Institute in Dakar, Senegal, will be deployed using a ‘mobile suitcase laboratory’ which is designed for low-resource settings. The portable laboratory includes a solar panel, a power pack and a results reader which is the size of a small laptop.

The reagents used in the test are available as dried pellets, which are ‘cold-chain-independent’, meaning that they can be used and transported at room temperature. Similarly to the tests currently in use, the new test detects the genetic material of the virus. The pilot trial will test whether the reagents are safe and effective to use with Ebola patients’ blood and saliva samples…